Minimally Invasive

The principals of minimally invasive care were published in the British Medical Journal in 1987.  Since then they have been adopted to varying degrees in both medical and dental practice.

Minimally invasive care is a concept for diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment which:

  • Incorporates system and process thinking
  • Includes risk assessment and is more proactive (versus reactive)
  • Recognizes that the earlier your problems are diagnosed and treated:
    • the less advanced the problems are likely to have become
    • the more likely an optimal whole system prognosis may be achievable with favorable predictability
    • the more likely an optimal whole system prognosis may be achievable with less invasive treatment
  • Integrates four nested components: prevention, early detection, early intervention, and individual optimized therapeutics

  • Is focused on regenerative versus resective procedures
  • Recognizes that individually optimized care is best facilitated by a philosophy of multi-subspecialization (instead of one of subspecialization)
  • Is a natural bridge which facilitates adoption of other contemporary concepts of care
  • Fits within the framework of an integrative approach to care

A philosophy of minimally invasive orthodontic care:

  • Applies the concepts of minimally invasive care
  • Results in a clinically distinct approach

A minimally invasive philosophy has the potential to significantly impact various aspects of orthodontic care including diagnostics, early treatment, surgical recommendations, and more.  A philosophy of avoiding early treatment, braces, extractions, and/or jaw surgery is not minimally invasive orthodontic care.

EXAMPLES OF MINIMALLY INVASIVE ORTHODONTIC CARE

VISUALIZATION OF ROOTS AT RISK DUE TO TOOTH PROXIMITIES & ORTHODONTIC MECHANICS

In this case risks related to unerupted teeth overlying the roots of erupted teeth were recognized, treatment mechanics were adjusted to minimize the risks, and the potential for root damage and impaction was averted.

  Before                                         After

MINIMALLY INVASIVE TREATMENT

In these cases subspecialized procedures allowed resolution of significant orthodontic problems. These procedures were less invasive than jaw surgery and were considered to have advantages with respect to predictability and other factors versus other alternatives.

Case 1

                                               

                       

Case 2